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12 Tips To Boost Your Memory | American Anti Aging Mag

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12 Tips To Boost Your Memory

improve your memory

Photo by Helga Weber via Flickr

It’s not uncommon that I remember too well old events, but also start forgetting simple things like “where did I put my keys?” or “did I turn off the lights?”, or even forgetting the name of person that I’ve known well… Does this also happen to you?

Thankfully, research is finding new ways to sharpen memory now and keep it strong as we get older.

#1 Repeat yourself.

To help get a routine activity lodged in your brain, say it out loud as you do it, advises Cynthia Green, Ph.D., president of Memory Arts LLC, a company that provides memory fitness training. The same trick — repeating aloud “I’m getting the scissors” — fends off distraction as you head into the kitchen for them. Memory experts also advise that you repeat a person’s name as you’re introduced (“Hi, Alice”) and again as you finish your conversation (“Nice talking with you, Alice”), but if that feels forced, just repeat the name to yourself as you walk away.

#2 Bite off bigger pieces.

Since your brain can process only so much information at a time, try chunking bits together. By repeating a phone number as “thirty-eight, twenty-seven” instead of “3, 8, 2, 7,” you only have to remember two numbers, not four, Dr. Small points out. If you need to buy ground beef, milk, lettuce, cereal, and buns, you might think “dinner” (burgers, buns, lettuce) and “breakfast” (cereal and milk).

#3 Give words more meaning.

When you’re introduced — let’s say to Sally — you can make up a rhyme (“Sally in the alley”) or connect the name to a song (“Mustang Sally”). Some people swear by devices like mnemonics. One New York City dog owner never leaves for the morning walk without her three b’s (bags, biscuits, ball) and two t’s (telephone, tissues).

#5 Create unlikely connections.

Jennifer Rapaport, a mother of three in Somerville, MA, switches her watch to the other wrist when she needs to remember something. The oddity of not finding the watch where it should be triggers her recall.

#6 Stop trying so hard.

You’re watching an old movie on TV and can’t think of the lead actor’s name. “What is it?” you fret. “Why can’t I remember?” Then an hour later, as you’re peeling carrots, “Clark Gable” pops into your head. “Anxiety distracts us, making it even harder to remember,” says Dr. Small. De-stressing — taking deep breaths, thinking of something pleasant — can break the cycle.

#7 Sleep on it.

You also need sleep to make long-term memories last. Studies at Harvard Medical School have shown that when people are given a random list of words to memorize, those who then sleep will recall more words afterward than those who are tested without a chance to sack out.


#8 Address your stress.

Ever wonder why, when you’re already having a maddening day, your memory goes on the blink, too? Blame the stress hormone cortisol. When you’re on edge, it increases in the hippocampus — the brain’s control center for learning and memory — and may interfere with encoding information or retrieving it. Cumulatively, this can be serious: “As you get older, chronic elevated cortisol levels are linked to memory impairment and a smaller hippocampus,” says Shireen Sindi, a researcher in the department of neurology and neurosurgery at McGill University. Another compelling reason to deal with issues that make you stressed.


#9 Eat to your brain’s content.

Foods that keep your heart healthy are also good for your brain. Fish high in omega-3 fatty acids (including sardines and salmon) fight artery-damaging inflammation. Ditto for walnuts. Berries, especially blueberries, are loaded with anthocyanins — potent antioxidants that protect cells, including those in the brain. Blueberries may also have the power to create new pathways for connection in the brain: These connectors tend to die off with age, but in animal studies, blueberry consumption has been shown to help restore them, says Jim Joseph, Ph.D., director of the neuroscience lab at the USDA Human Nutrition Research Center on Aging, Tufts University.

#10 Take a walk (down memory lane).

When you exercise, your brain gets a workout of its own. A new study of 161 adults ages 59 to 81 found that the hippocampus was larger in those who were physically active. “Fitness improvement — even if you’ve been sedentary most of your life — leads to an increase in volume of this brain region,” explains Art Kramer, Ph.D., professor of psychology and neuroscience at the University of Illinois and coauthor of the study. And the bigger the hippocampus, the better able you are to form new memories. You don’t have to live at the gym. “Just get out and walk for an hour a few days a week,” says Kramer.

#11 Practice paying attention.

What color hair did the barista who made your latte this morning have? Was your husband wearing a blue or red tie? Even if you’ll never need the information, forcing yourself to observe and recall the details of your day sharpens your memory, says Dr. Small.

#12 Play mind games.

Doing something mentally challenging — working a crossword puzzle, learning an instrument — creates fresh connections in your brain. “You can actually generate new cells in the hippocampus,” says Peter Snyder, Ph.D., professor of clinical neurosciences at the Warren Alpert School of Medicine at Brown University. Those new cells build cognitive reserves that are important for creating new memories and may protect against memory loss — even dementia — later in life. Games that work to improve processing speed may deliver an extra boost, Smith has found. In a group of older adults, his (company-funded) studies of the computer game Brain Fitness showed that players had a significant improvement in cognitive skills, including memory, compared with those in a control group. Anything that requires working against the clock can help. “A timed game like Boggle or Simon will force you to pay attention, work quickly, and think flexibly,” says Green.

…more at: http://www.webmd.com/balance/features/improve-your-memory

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  1. Karl says:

    I noted that item 12 was to play word games. I too believe this and devised a simple game that runs on Android phones or tablets. It is called 3 Lil Letters. The goal is to create as many words within a given time period using 3 letter selected by the game. There are different levels to the game to keep you challenged. You can find the link and more info at the http://www.extendyourmind.com website. Thanks.

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